Back » Marine Protector Class

This unique 87 foot patrol boat is a small but capable multi-mission platform designed for Search and Rescue (SAR), Law Enforcement (LE), and fisheries patrols, as well as drug interdiction and illegal alien interdiction duties up to 200 miles off shore. The CPB incorporates Bollinger’s innovative stern notch design allowing for underway launch and recovery of the cutter’s 7 meter RHIB. To date Bollinger has delivered 73 CPBs to inland and coastal ports all over the continental United States, including Alaska and Hawaii.

This summary will provide some general information on the new 87 foot Coastal Patrol Boat designed and built for the U.S. Coast Guard. This unique vessel is a multi-mission platform capable of performing Search and Rescue (SAR), Law Enforcement (LE), and Fisheries patrols, as well as drug interdiction and illegal alien interdiction duties up to 200 miles off shore. The design was developed to meet the operational mission requirements established by the USCG Assistant Commandant for Operations. These requirements included but were not limited to:

  • » Maximum continuous speed of 25 knots
  • » Patrol speed not less than 10 knots
  • » Maneuvering speed not greater than 4 knots with one engine continuously engaged
  • » Berthing for any mix of male/female crew members of 10 plus a spare berth
  • » Based on a Proven Hull Design (parent craft) with at least two years service similar to the duties performed by the existing 82 foot Point class cutters
  • » Maximum crew comfort consistent with the operational requirements
  • » Provisions for stores for a crew of 10 for a 5 day mission

Additionally, the vessel was designed in accordance with the American Bureau of Shipping's "Guide of Building and Classing High Speed Crafts" and is capable of towing vessels weighing up to 200 tons. One of the most important design requirements is the necessity to provide a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat with a launching system that provides for the launch and recovery of the RIB in seas up to 2.5 meter (8 feet) wave height. Bollinger Shipyards, Inc. was selected in this very competitive program to construct the Patrol Boat. Bollinger's design is based on the Damen STAN 2600. Damen Shipyard had originally developed their design for the Hong Kong Police. Bollinger modified the design to meet the specific requirements of the U.S. Coast Guard. To meet the stringent requirements for the RIB Launch and Recovery system, Bollinger enlisted the assistance of one of the United Kingdom's most noted designers, Mr. David Cannell B.So., C. Eng., M.R.I.N.A. Mr. Cannell had previously designed a stern launch and recovery system that has been successfully utilized on the PROTECTOR III, a North Seas Fisheries Patrol Vessel. This Mother/Daughter ship design was adapted to the Damen STAN 2600.

USCG CPB Sea Trials

Outboard Profile & Plans

Outoard Profile


Hold Plan
Deck Plan


Pilothouse

Principal Characteristics

LOA 26.5 meters (87 feet)
Length at Waterline 24.87 meters (80 feet 10 inches)
Beam Molded 5.92 meters (19 feet 4 inches)
Maximum Draft 1.74 meters (5 feet 8 inches)
Compliment 10
Berthing 12
Main Engines (2) MTU 8V 396 TE94
Reduction Gears (2) ZF BW 255
Generators (2) Man DO 824 LF01
Stamford Newage
Fuel Capacity 10.6 cubic meters (approximately 2,500 gallons)
Potable Water 1500 L (approximately 400 gallons)
Gray Water Holding 200 L (approximately 55 gallons)
Sewage Holding 1500 L (approximately 400 gallons)
Propellers (2) 5 blade
Armament (2) 50 cal. machine guns and small arms
Electronics Suite » Coast Guard Standard Radar
» Electronic Chart Display (ECDIS)
» Gyro
» Auto Pilot
» Loran C
» Doppler Speed Log
» ADF
» VHF/UHF
» HF
» Fathometer
» Wind Speed Indicator
» Magnetic Compass (Digital)


The pilot house of the Marine Protector Class is a dramatic improvement over the aging Point Class cutters. The fully integrated system is housed in an area of 205 square feet as opposed to the 42 square feet on the Point class. The command and control console stretches the full width of the pilot house and has been ergonomically designed to accommodate varying crew member heights, since the crews are typically represented by 5% female and 95% male. Visibility is a full 360 degrees with no obstructions from mast, exhaust, or other hull structure. There are seventeen heated windows, including two sliding windows, to ensure that the commanding officer has a full view of the surrounding area.


The navigation station faces forward and can accommodate full sized charts without folding. The Electronic Chart Display (ECDIS) with radar overlay, is visible from the Navigation station, the helmsman's position, and the Commanding Officer's chair. The ECDIS system is a Windows-based computer system that has pre-programmed search and rescue patterns including trackline, expanding square, and sector searches.


The vessel has a ship's office to house the U.S. Coast Guard Standard Workstation (Personal Computer) and a fiber optic Local Area Network (LAN) that can be used internally or externally when connected to a shore tie. Accommodations for two safes for the storage of classified material are also provided in the ship's office.


The vessel's internal and external communications system is a fully integrated system developed originally for the Canadian Coast Guard and includes features for:


Internal Communication
Telephone
General announcing
Cease fire alarms
General alarms


External Communication
Loudhailing
Fog horn

The 1500 HP Main Propulsion Engines are a proven design used very extensively in yachts and patrol craft around the world. The system includes a slow speed drive capability to ensure that the vessel can maneuver in restricted waters as well as tow small pleasure craft after a successful search and rescue mission. The engine control and monitoring system is equipped with an operational data recorder to provide for performance-based maintenance and to improve logistic support. To increase endurance, the vessel is equipped with a 250 gallon per day reverse osmosis water maker.


The Rib Launch and Recovery System allows for the safe and rapid deployment and recovery of the RIB with minimal assistance from the crew of the "mother" ship. To commence the launch, the boat crew boards the vessel and starts the diesel water-jet engine. The transom gate is then raised hydraulically from the down position to an open position parallel to and over the main deck. The crew then activates a quick release hook, allowing the force of gravity to slide the RIB down a thirteen degree incline and out of the stern. For recovery, the coxswain can either drive the RIB into the notch and up the incline where a crew man passes a line over a Samson post to capture the craft or the coxswain can winch the RIB into the notch using a high speed electric winch mounted on the main deck of the "mother" ship. The aluminum hull RIB has a foam collar with an inflatable bladder beneath it to provide durability and safety. The Rib has a top speed in excess of 20 knots when carrying six crew members but approaches 30 knots with a two person crew.


Crew comfort is achieved though the use of four two-person staterooms and one four-person stateroom. Each stateroom is provided with internal telephones and sound-powered phones as well as sinks and potable water service. There are two water closets and two showers to give maximum utilization to the sanitary facilities. The mess deck has seating for nine crew members and is furnished with television, VCR, and stereo equipment for crew relaxation.

Program Information

Marine Protector Class - Coastal Patrol Boat (CPB)

The U.S. Coast Guard initiated the acquisition of the Marine Protector class of 87-foot coastal patrol boats (CPB) in 1993 to replace the aging 82-ft Point-class patrol boats. Using an acquisition strategy initially developed by the Coast Guard for the 110-foot Island Class patrol boats the CPB design is based upon an existing design for the Damen Stan Patrol 2600, then proven in service with the Hong Kong Police. Bollinger has developed the unique experience in modifying proven "parent craft” designs to meet the exacting needs of the Coast Guard. This strategy continues to offer the Government a low risk, proven-in-service design with a considerably reduced design cycle time and without sacrificing Coast Guard mission performance.

The Bollinger 87-foot CPB design offers improved seakeeping, electronics, and communications. Our engineering department collaborated with a widely recognized marine safety and human factors engineering firm to incorporate improved operability and crew habitability features, including a superior pilothouse design featuring 360° unobstructed views. Perhaps the most significant design innovation was the incorporation of a stern notch launch and recovery system providing the CPB with the capability to safely and quickly launch and recover the cutter’s 5.5m RHIB (Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat) while underway and in heavy seas.

Bollinger also provided a complete logistics package including preventative maintenance procedures, on board spare parts, deep insurance spares, crew familiarization, factory training and technical manuals for all major equipment, through our Integrated Logistics Support organization; Chand, LLC.

Originally, a single cutter was awarded under the contract, with the delivery in April 1998. Once in full production, Bollinger delivered a CPB every twenty-eight days until mid-2002. The contract initially had option provisions for up to 50 additional vessels with their associated spares. To date, Bollinger has delivered 73 CPBs to the U.S. Coast Guard and 4 cutters under two Foreign Military Sales programs with two cutters going to each of the republics of Malta and Yemen.

Marine Protector Class - Coastal Patrol Boat (CPB)

These modern, high speed cutters join their sister Island Class 110-foot cutters, called the "best patrol boat in the world" by both the former Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard and a former Chief of Naval Operations, in performing the traditional Coast Guard missions of search and rescue, port security, maritime law enforcement and other humanitarian missions conducted by of the U.S. Coast Guard. The Marine Protector Class cutters will continue to enable the U. S. Coast Guard to perform its missions that remain vital to our homeland security, our economy, and our national security, for years to come.

Contract Status and Homeports

Vessel Hull # Name Launch B T A T Delivery Date Home Port
CPB 01 87301 Barracuda 01/18/98 03/01/98 03/09/98 04/07/98 Eureka, CA
CPB 02 87302 Hammerhead 05/11/98 06/22/98 06/30/98 07/29/98 Woods Hole, MA
CPB 03 87303 Mako 06/22/98 08/03/98 08/11/98 09/09/98 Cape May, NJ
CPB 04 87304 Marlin 09/14/98 09/21/98 09/29/98 12/02/98 Fort Meyers, FL
CPB 05 87305 Stingray 09/21/98 12/07/98 12/15/98 01/13/99 Mobile, AL
CPB 06 87306 Dorado 12/07/98 01/18/99 01/26/99 02/24/99 Crescent City, CA
CPB 07 87307 Osprey 01/18/99 03/01/99 03/08/99 04/07/99 Port Townsend, WA
CPB 08 87308 Chinook 03/01/99 04/12/99 04/21/99 05/19/99 New London, CT
CPB 09 87309 Albacore 04/06/99 05/24/99 06/01/99 06/30/99 Little Creek, VA
CPB 10 87310 Tarpon 05/18/99 07/05/99 07/14/99 08/11/99 Savannah, GA
CPB 11 87311 Cobia 06/15/99 08/02/99 08/11/99 09/08/99 Mobile, AL
CPB 12 87312 Hawksbill 07/27/99 08/30/99 09/08/99 10/06/99 Oceanside, CA
CPB 13 87313 Cormorant 08/24/99 09/27/99 10/06/99 11/03/99 Fort Pierce, FL
CPB 14 87314 Finback 09/21/99 10/25/99 11/03/99 12/01/99 Cape May, NJ
CPB 15 87315 Amberjack 10/19/99 11/22/99 12/01/99 12/29/99 Port Isabel, TX
CPB 16 87316 Kittiwake 11/16/99 12/20/99 01/04/00 01/26/00 Nawiliwilli, HI
CPB 17 87317 Blackfin 12/14/99 01/17/00 01/26/00 02/23/00 Santa Barbara, CA
CPB 18 87318 Bluefin 01/11/00 02/16/00 02/23/00 03/22/00 Fort Pierce, FL
CPB 19 87319 Yellowfin 02/08/00 03/15/00 03/22/00 04/19/00 Charleston, SC
CPB 20 87320 Manta 03/08/00 04/10/00 04/19/00 05/17/00 Freeport, TX
CPB 21 87321 Coho 04/04/00 05/08/00 05/17/00 06/14/00 Panama City, FL
CPB 22 87322 Kingfisher 05/02/00 06/05/00 06/14/00 07/12/00 Mayport, FL
CPB 23 87323 Seahawk 05/30/00 07/03/00 07/12/00 08/09/00 Carrabelle, FL
CPB 24 87324 Steelhead 06/27/00 07/31/00 08/09/00 09/06/00 Port Aransas, TX
CPB 25 87325 Beluga 07/25/00 08/28/00 09/06/00 10/04/00 Little Creek, VA
CPB 26 87326 Blacktip 08/22/00 09/25/00 10/04/00 11/01/00 Oxnard, CA
CPB 27 87327 Pelican 09/19/00 10/23/00 11/01/00 11/29/00 Morgan City, LA
CPB 28 87328 Ridley 10/17/00 11/20/00 11/29/00 12/27/00 Montauk, NY
CPB 29 87329 Cochito 11/14/00 12/18/00 12/27/00 01/24/01 Little Creek, VA
CPB 30 87330 Manowar 12/12/00 01/15/01 01/24/01 02/21/01 Galveston, TX
CPB 31 87331 Moray 01/09/01 02/12/01 02/21/01 03/21/01 Jonesport, ME
CPB 32 87332 Razorbill 02/06/01 03/12/01 03/21/01 04/18/01 Gulfport, MS
CPB 33 87333 Adelie 03/06/01 04/09/01 04/18/01 05/16/01 Port Angeles, WA
CPB 34 87334 Gannet 04/03/01 05/07/01 05/16/01 06/13/01 Cape Canaveral, FL
CPB 35 87335 Narwhal 05/01/01 06/04/01 06/13/01 07/11/01 Corpus Christi, TX
CPB 36 87336 Sturgeon 05/29/01 07/02/01 07/11/01 08/08/01 Newport Beach, CA
CPB 37 87337 Sockeye 06/26/01 07/30/01 08/08/01 09/05/01 Grand Isle, LA
CPB 38 87338 Ibis 07/24/01 08/27/01 09/05/01 10/03/01 Bodega Bay, CA
CPB 39 87339 Pompano 08/21/01 09/24/01 10/03/01 10/31/01 Cape May, NJ
CPB 40 87340 Halibut 09/18/01 10/22/01 10/31/01 11/28/01 Gulfport, MS
CPB 41 87341 Bonito 10/16/01 11/19/01 11/28/01 12/26/01 Marina Del Ray, CA
CPB 42 87342 Shrike 11/13/01 12/17/01 12/26/01 01/23/02 Pensacola, FL
CPB 43 87343 Tern 12/11/01 01/14/02 01/23/02 02/20/02 San Fransico, CA
CPB 44 87344 Heron 01/08/02 02/11/02 02/20/02 03/20/02 Sabine, TX
CPB 45 87345 Wahoo 02/05/02 03/11/02 03/20/02 04/17/02 Port Angeles, WA
CPB 46 87346 Flyingfish 03/05/02 04/08/02 04/17/02 05/15/02 Newport, RI
CPB 47 87347 Haddock 04/02/02 05/06/02 05/15/02 06/12/02 San Diego, CA
CPB 48 87348 Brant 04/30/02 06/03/02 06/12/02 07/10/02 San Diego, CA
CPB 49 87349 Shearwater 05/28/02 07/01/02 07/10/02 08/07/02 Port Angelos, WA
CPB 50 87350 Petrel 06/25/02 07/29/02 08/07/02 09/04/02 Portsmouth, VA
CPB 52 87352 Sea Lion 08/19/03 10/13/03 10/22/03 11/18/03 Bellingham, WA
CPB 53 87353 Skip Jack 10/10/03 11/10/03 11/19/03 12/16/03 Galveston, TX
CPB 54 87354 Dolphin 11/07/03 12/10/03 12/17/03 01/13/04 Miami Beach, FL
CPB 55 87355 Hawk 12/09/03 01/05/04 01/14/04 02/10/04 St. Petersburg, FL
CPB 56 87356 Sailfish 12/30/03 02/02/04 02/11/04 03/09/04 Sandy Hook, NJ
CPB 57 87357 Sawfish 01/27/04 03/01/04 03/10/04 04/06/04 Key West, FL
CPB 58 87358 Swordfish 12/27/04 01/31/05 02/09/05 03/08/05 Port Angles, WA
CPB 59 87359 Tiger Shark 01/24/05 02/28/05 03/09/05 04/05/05 Newport, RI
CPB 60 87360 Blue Shark 02/21/05 03/28/05 04/06/05 05/03/05 Everett, WA
CPB 61 87361 Sea Horse 03/21/05 04/25/05 05/04/05 05/31/05 Portsmouth, VA
CPB 62 87362 Sea Otter 04/18/05 05/23/05 06/01/05 06/28/05 San Diego, CA
CPB 63 87363 Manatee 05/16/05 06/20/05 06/29/05 07/26/05 Ingleside, TX
CPB 64 87364 Ahi 06/13/05 07/18/05 07/27/05 08/23/05 Honolulu, HI
CPB 65 87365 Pike 07/11/05 08/15/05 08/24/05 09/20/05 San Francisco, CA
CPB 66 87366 Terrapin 08/08/05 09/12/05 09/21/05 10/18/05 Bellingham, WA
CPB 67 87367 Sea Dragon 07/30/07 01/10/07 10/10/07 11/01/07 Kings Bay, GA
CPB 68 83668 Sea Devil 12/11/07 07/01/08 01/16/08 02/08/08 Bangor, WA
CPB 69 87369 Crcodile 06/30/08 08/18/08 08/27/08 10/13/08 St. Pete, FL
CPB 70 87370 Diamondback 08/18/08 10/20/08 10/20/08 11/17/08 Miami, FL
CPB 71 87371 Reef Shark 09/22/08 11/30/08 03/12/08 04/01/09 San Juan, PR
CPB 72 87372 Alligator 10/27/08 12/29/08 08/01/09 01/26/09 St. Pete, FL
CPB 73 87373 Sea Dog 01/12/08 02/02/09 11/02/09 03/04/09 Kings Bay, GA
CPB 74 87374 Sea Fox 05/01/09 06/04/09 04/15/09 06/05/09 Bangor, WA

Logistics and Training

CHAND provides expertise in all areas of logistics support, from Reliability-Centered Maintenance Engineers to Technical Maintenance Support Representatives.

CHAND is your "One-Stop-Shop" for your logistical needs. Recognized by the Ship's Bell, CHAND is commited to supporting our men and women serving in the defense of our nation.

Learn more by visiting their website: www.CHAND.com